Land Surveying Photos

Center ¼ Corner

Northern Sauk County, WI
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Thoughts

  • Wow, that's a great monument!

    One of the things i find interesting about surveying is that you sometimes find monuments and other evidence which are a century old or even older.

  • Matt, that's a great example.  I think it is the first U.S. Public Land Survey Monument Record "dossier", "tie-sheet" ever shared on LSU.  Can you post it in .jpg?

  • https://storage.ning.com/topology/rest/1.0/file/get/1201176359?profile=original
  • It is always a treat to find evidence that is a century old.  In a hundred years from now, in 2111, my "footsteps" should be as easily retraced.

  • For those of us who do not know, BT means Bearing Tree.  A bearing tree is a tree near the corner that has been marked and has been documented as such, with a direction and distance to the true corner.

  • Scott,

    As the stone was tipped, but two BTs remained, I actually set a rod from the Bts that fit the base of the stone. So, there is a rod below the stone that rings out very nice.

    I actually had to rake leaves for a bit and cut out some fallen trees to get the stone once i found and figured out the BTs and their orientation:

    Probably spent the better part of a morning figuring it out.  This is a great opportunity for me to post a document; I will throw a .PDF of the tie sheet up in a little while.

    Matt

  • Awesome.  I have not found one like this yet.  I wish all the stone monuments in Wisconsin could be so obvious.  Did you place a magnet there?  I like to place magnets at stone monuments so that I can find them again with a metal detector.  I have yet to find a good stone finder manufacturer.

  • Wow! Thank you for sharing this picture.. :)

  • Arnel,

    The stone was found as set by a County Surveyor in the early 1900s along with two bearing trees still standing. He made a nice cut in the stone. Here is another shot of it lying down, as I found it tipped:

    Matt

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