Northern Sauk County, WI

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Reply by Tim K. on December 30, 2012 at 7:52pm

Wow, that's a great monument!

One of the things i find interesting about surveying is that you sometimes find monuments and other evidence which are a century old or even older.

Reply by Matthew M Filus on December 2, 2011 at 9:17pm

Reply by Scott D. Warner, PLS on December 2, 2011 at 9:11pm

Matt, that's a great example.  I think it is the first U.S. Public Land Survey Monument Record "dossier", "tie-sheet" ever shared on LSU.  Can you post it in .jpg?

Reply by Matthew M Filus on December 2, 2011 at 9:02pm
Reply by Scott D. Warner, PLS on December 2, 2011 at 8:58pm

It is always a treat to find evidence that is a century old.  In a hundred years from now, in 2111, my "footsteps" should be as easily retraced.

Reply by Scott D. Warner, PLS on December 2, 2011 at 8:45pm

For those of us who do not know, BT means Bearing Tree.  A bearing tree is a tree near the corner that has been marked and has been documented as such, with a direction and distance to the true corner.

Reply by Matthew M Filus on December 2, 2011 at 8:31pm

Scott,

As the stone was tipped, but two BTs remained, I actually set a rod from the Bts that fit the base of the stone. So, there is a rod below the stone that rings out very nice.

I actually had to rake leaves for a bit and cut out some fallen trees to get the stone once i found and figured out the BTs and their orientation:

Probably spent the better part of a morning figuring it out.  This is a great opportunity for me to post a document; I will throw a .PDF of the tie sheet up in a little while.

Matt

Reply by Scott D. Warner, PLS on December 2, 2011 at 8:13pm

Awesome.  I have not found one like this yet.  I wish all the stone monuments in Wisconsin could be so obvious.  Did you place a magnet there?  I like to place magnets at stone monuments so that I can find them again with a metal detector.  I have yet to find a good stone finder manufacturer.

Reply by Arnel M. Domag on December 2, 2011 at 5:40am

Wow! Thank you for sharing this picture.. :)

Reply by Matthew M Filus on December 2, 2011 at 12:17am

Arnel,

The stone was found as set by a County Surveyor in the early 1900s along with two bearing trees still standing. He made a nice cut in the stone. Here is another shot of it lying down, as I found it tipped:

Matt

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