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  • Your welcome Scott!
    Scott D. Warner, R.L.S. said:

    Paul, thanks for asking; and Jill thank you for answering correctly!  It takes a female surveyor to know about husbands. :)  I was hoping it wasn't language for "ocean front property, especially in Arizona, where Paul is from. :)

  • Hello Deward, I can't believe it...this website is to much!

    Deward Karl Bowles said:

    I love this place. Good answers!

  • I love this place. Good answers!

  • Paul, thanks for asking; and Jill thank you for answering correctly!  It takes a female surveyor to know about husbands. :)  I was hoping it wasn't language for "ocean front property, especially in Arizona, where Paul is from. :)

  • Hello All,

    Thanks for your input...another surveyor wrote:

     

    Et mar is an abbreviation of et maritus, the Latin for "and husband." It's used in the same manner as "et ux." (Latin et uxor), meaning "and wife." I believe the abbreviation et vir is more commonly found in deeds, however, et mar is the more appropriate term as the Latin, vir, refers to "man," in general and not necessarily a husband.

    In the same context, et al, (Latin et alii) means "and others." (As opposed to other contexts were et al may refer to the Latin et alibi, meaning "somewhere else.")

     

    Have a good day, rlshound

     

  • It can be used as an abbreviation for et maritus, meaning "and husband", after a woman's name (used same as et ux meaning "and wife")

  • I agree with Scott. "Et Mar" derives from Latin and my suggestion would be "at see". As has been pointed out context is important but with just that clue I would think it would be a call to the sea.

  • Party Chief

    et as adv. , [also, even]; as conj., [and; and indeed]; in narrative, [and then]; occasionally adversative, [and yet]; after alius, idem, par, [as or than]; repeated et....et...., [both....and...]; so -que....et....; nec (neque)....et, [not only not....but]

    mare -is n. [the sea]; 'mare nostrum' , [the Mediterranean]; 'superum', [the Adriatic]; 'inferum', [the Tyrrhenian Sea].



    Scott D. Warner, R.L.S. said:

    Paul, taken in context, is there anything else involved that would suggest "and sea" would make sense?

  • Party Chief

    in French it is 'and march'  and google translate thinks so...

    however looking at this list of latin terms related to legal, it is not listed but "mare" shows up several times indicating water, like scott said

    perhaps Karl will have some insight...good question!

  • Paul, taken in context, is there anything else involved that would suggest "and sea" would make sense?

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